June 14, 2022 10 min read

What is the difference between vermicomposting and vermiculture?

 

 

 

 

There is often some confusion about the difference between vermicomposting and vermiculture.

This blog post will clear up any misconceptions and explain the key differences between these two methods of composting.

Vermicomposting is the process of using worms to break down organic matter into compost, while vermiculture is the process of breeding worms for their castings (compost).

Let's take a closer look at each of these processes!

What is the difference between vermicomposting and vermiculture?

Vermicomposting is the process of using worms to break down organic matter into compost.

This organic matter can be anything from kitchen scraps to manure. Vermicompost is a composting product made from various species of worms, most commonly red wigglers(aka tiger worm, manure worm) and other earthworms, Organic wastes, decomposing vegetable or food waste, bedding materials, and vermicast.

Vermicast (also known as worm castings, black gold, or worm manure) is the final product of organic matter breakdown by earthworms.

Earthworm excreta have been found to be lower in impurities and higher in nutrients than the organic materials they replaced.

The worms eat the organic matter and excrete it as castings (vermicast).

Worm castings are very rich in nutrients, so they make an excellent fertilizer for plants.

Vermiculture is also a sustainable way to breed worms, as there is no need to use synthetic chemicals or pesticides.

Vermiculture is a great option if you are looking to produce worm compost on a larger scale.

What is the difference between vermicomposting and vermiculture?

Vermiculture is the process of breeding worms for their castings (compost).

This process is often used on a larger scale, as it is a sustainable way to produce compost.

Worm castings are very rich in nutrients, so they make an excellent fertilizer for plants.

Vermiculture is also a sustainable way to breed worms, as there is no need to use synthetic chemicals or pesticides.

While vermicomposting and vermiculture are both great options for composting, it is important to know the difference between the two processes.

Vermicomposting is a great option if you are looking to produce compost on a smaller scale, while vermiculture is a more sustainable option for the larger-scale process of Vermicompost.

Vermiculture is the practice of growing or rearing composting worms and, as a consequence, Vermiculture means artificial rearing or cultivation of worms.

Earthworm worm feces (vermicompost) is a high-humus substance.

 Earthworms consume organic waste or farm yard manure, as well as other agricultural rubbish, and transform it into vermicompost by passing it through their bodies.

In the same way, municipal waste; non-toxic solid and liquid industrial waste, and household garbage may all be transformed into vermicompost.

Earthworms not only turn solid and organic material into valuable worm poop, but they also maintain the ecosystem.

The conversion of waste by earthworms to compost and the multiplication of earthworms are straightforward procedures that can be accomplished with little effort by farmers.

So, what's the difference between vermicompost and vermiculture?

Vermicomposting is the process of using worms to break down organic material into compost, while vermiculture is the process of breeding worms for their castings.

Both processes have their own unique benefits, so it really depends on what you are looking for in a composting method.

If you are interested in reducing your kitchen waste ie: vegetable and fruit peels, then vermicomposting is a great option.

If you are looking to produce compost on a larger scale, then vermiculture might be a better choice.

Whichever method you choose, you will end up with high-quality compost that is rich in nutrients and beneficial for plants!

Which is better compost or vermicompost?

Compared to compost, vermicompost is a good source of nutrients for the soil to improve soil structure and improve water holding capacity.

Vermicomposts are ideal organic fertilizers to increase the productivity of numerous plants.

Is vermicompost enough for plants?

 

Vermicompost is suitable for many plant types and situations.

It gives you easy ways of eliminating food scraps and yard waste.

It is relatively easy to find earthworms to get started with this method.

You don’t need a lot of space for vermicomposting, and it can be done indoors or outdoors.

Vermicomposting is also great for people who want to reduce their carbon footprint.

If you are looking for an environmentally friendly way to compost, vermicomposting is a great option!

Vermicomposting has many benefits, but it is important to know that it is not a silver bullet for all gardening problems.

With that being said, vermicompost is a great way to reduce your kitchen waste, add nutrients to your soil, and help the environment!

2. What are the benefits of vermicomposting and vermiculture over conventional composting methods?

There are many benefits to vermicomposting and vermiculture over traditional composting methods.

For one, worms are very efficient at breaking down organic material, so you will end up with high-quality compost for plant growth.

Vermicomposting is also great for indoor gardening since it doesn't require a lot of space.

All you need to start worm composting is a worm bin which can be made from plastic bins (tote), usable compost, food waste, and some vermicompost worms (red wigglers or European Nightcrawlers) are the best for your garden soil.

Vermiculture is a great option if you are looking to produce compost on a larger scale.

Worm castings are very rich in nutrients, so they make an excellent fertilizer for plants.

Vermiculture is also a sustainable way to breed worms, as there is no need to use synthetic chemicals or pesticides.

Things you will need to start Vermicompost:

  1. Worm bin or Worm bins (You can make your own easy)
  2. Worm bedding (shredded paper, shredded newspaper, cardboard, or any organic material). What is organic material? organic matter is anything that was once alive. ie trees, vegetables, plant material, grasses, and coffee grounds just to name a few.
  3. Worms, What worm species you would like to start with is up to you, but the easiest worm species to care for are the red wiggler and the European Nightcrawlerwhich you can purchase here at Memes Worms. More about worms later.
  4. Water, Make sure if you are using tap water you let it sit 24hrs to let any chlorine evaporate before misting your composting worms.
  5. Temperature and Location, Your worm bin can be placed inside or outside. If you are keeping your worm bin inside make sure it's in an area that stays between 55-77 degrees Fahrenheit. If your worm bin is outside and the temperature drops below freezing in the winter months, you may want to consider bringing your worm bin(s) inside for the winter.
  6. You will need worms for these worm bins, which you can purchase from us here

 

3. How can you get started with vermicomposting or vermiculture in your own backyard or garden plot?

If you are interested in vermicomposting, there are many ways to get started.

You can purchase a worm bin or build your own.

You will also need to purchase some worms (red wigglers are a good option).

If you are looking for a worm bin for your garden consider the sub-pod mini.

Once you have your bin and worms, you can start adding organic substances, kitchen scraps are a great option.

You will need to add fresh organic matter every few days and be sure to keep the bin moist. After a few weeks, you will have high-quality compost!

If you are interested in vermiculture, the best way to get started is by ordering worms from a reputable supplier.

Before you have your worms, you will need to set up several worm bins.

You will also need to add organic matter to the bin and be sure to keep it moist.

After a few weeks, you will have high-quality compost!

Things you will need for Vermiculture

  1. Worm bins, or commercial bins we recommend these.
  2. Soil and organic matter, compost pile or large amounts of food waste.
  3. Water
  4. Space for a larger operation rather than a small space used for vermicompost.
  5. You will need worms for these worm bins, you can purchase from us here.

4. What should you consider before starting a vermicomposting or vermiculture system of your own design and construction?"

 

Before starting a vermicomposting or vermiculture system, there are a few things to consider.

First, you will need to choose a location for your bin. It should be in an area that is out of the sun and away from any drafts.

You will also need to decide what type of worms you want to use. Red wigglers are a good option for vermicomposting, but there are other options available for vermiculture.

Once you have your worms, you will need to add organic matter to the bin. kitchen scraps are a great option. You will need to add fresh organic matter every few days and be sure to keep the worm bin moist.

5. Are there any potential drawbacks to using these methods instead of traditional composting techniques, and if so, what are they?"

 

There are a few potential drawbacks to using vermicomposting or vermiculture instead of traditional composting techniques.

First, it can be difficult to keep the bin moist. If the bin dries out, the worms will die.

Second, if you don't add enough organic matter to the bin, the worms will start trying to escape.

Finally, vermicomposting and vermiculture require more maintenance than traditional composting.

You will need to add fresh organic matter to the bin every few days, and you will need to check on the worms regularly.

When using food scraps in your vermicompost bin you may encounter fruit flies.

The best practice to keep this from happening is to cover the food scraps with dry organic matter such as shredded paper.

Worms escaping? to prevent this always make sure you have moist bedding and plenty of food waste for them to eat.

Worms need moisture to breathe as they have no lungs and breathe through their skin.

If your worm bin becomes dry they may try to escape.

If you are willing to put in the extra effort, vermicomposting and vermiculture are great ways to reduce your kitchen waste, produce high-quality compost with beneficial microbes, and give plant nutrients.

6. Which method do I think is better for the average homeowner – vermicomposting or vermiculture?"

I think vermicomposting is better for the average homeowner.

It is easier to maintain, and you don't need to add fresh organic matter to the bin as often. You don't need a lot of space or equipment either.

Vermiculture can be difficult to keep moist, and if the bin dries out, the worms will die.

If you don't add enough organic matter to the bin, you may see worms escaping.

Vermicomposting is a great way to reduce your kitchen waste, produce high-quality compost with beneficial microbes, and fertilize your plants which is healthier for you than synthetic fertilizers.

What type of worm will you need for vermicomposting or Vermiculture?

 

 

The most common worm used for vermicompostingis the red wiggler (Eisenia Fetida), but there are other options available. Red wigglers are easy to take care of and don't require a lot of space. If you choose to use another type of worm for vermiculture, make sure you research their care requirements. Some types of worms may need a larger bin or more organic matter.

There are other worms that can be used

such as European NIghtcrawlers (Eisenia hortensis) (larger worm can be used as bait). The ENC can be used in a vermicomposting bin and will make great worm castings. Not as suitable for vermiculture only because it breeds a little bit slower.

The red wiggler and the European Nightcrawler can live together in harmony but will not breed with one another.

They require basically the same conditions as each other.

 

African Nightcrawler: (Eudrilus eugeniae (needs higher temps). Used a great deal in Vermiculture.

They grow larger, breed fast and can be used as bait. They do not need refrigeration or cool temps. They need to be kept above 50 degrees. These are great if you have the space and means to have a controlled environment. You can order them here: Memes Worms

 

Blue worm ( perionyx excavatus(ferocious eaters).

These worms are used in vermiculture and make great castings.

The blue worms are among the least popular composting worms, and the reasons for this will be explained in greater detail below.

However, they are also capable of vermicomposting and generating large quantities of castings.

They will also grow very quickly, and if you put them in a container with another species, they will possibly take over.

Because blues are tropical worms, they dislike temperatures below 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

However, in the winter, the average temperature in a basement is 60 degrees F.

I note that the bin's temperature is about 10°F higher than room temperature.

Outside, a bigger container will keep them warm throughout the winter.

If you have the room, and you reside in a chilly climate, providing them with shelter inside your garage or even indoors is beneficial.

Mass Exodus of Blue Worms

Previously, it was stated that blues are one of the least appealing worms

The primary reason that blues were formerly thought to be some of the most unappealing composting worms is that they may be picky about their environment.

It appears that they leave the bin when it becomes too chilly, wet, or there is a thunderstorm.I've never had this issue, and I live in Georgia but have other worm farmers that live up North and they say they live, where thunderstorms, snow, and rain are very common. My blues are extremely pleased with their bin and have never attempted to flee.

If you bring your worm bin inside, keep it away from anything vibrating or spinning (such as a refrigerator compressor or washing machine, air conditioner), as this will make worms anxious and when they are uncomfortable, they inevitably try to escape. This is applicable to any worm, regardless of species.

Worm castings (a.k.a. worm poop) are a great deal of fun and quite easy to produce, which is why composting with blue worms is so popular nowadays. Blue worms have a voracious appetite, making them ideal for generating worm castings (a.k.a. worm feces). This breed does not get as large as Red worms, yet they will eat more.

Like other composting worms, blue worms enjoy living in close quarters colonies. This, too, makes them fast breeders; many worm farmers believe they are an excellent choice forvermiculture.

In ideal circumstances, mature blue worms produce approximately 19 cocoons each week, with one hatchling emerging from each.

For more information on Vermicomposting and Vermiculture head over to "worm farming facts" and find a more in detail look at all aspects of worm farming.

 

Order your worms here


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